The Maker Movement and the Kinesthetic Learner

ART, little girl with totem poleJune 17-23, 2016 is the National Week of Making! During this week, organizations and individuals across the country are coming together to celebrate making, creating, innovating, and tinkering.

And, to commemorate this year’s National Week of Making, the White House will be announcing new actions by organizations, as well as by recognizing individuals who are making significant contributions to Making and the Maker Movement.

What is the Maker Movement?

According to Gary Stager in “What’s the Maker Movement and Why Should I Care?” The shift to “making” represents the perfect storm of new technological materials, expanded opportunities, learning through firsthand experience, and the basic human impulse to create. It offers the potential to make classrooms more child-centered: relevant and more sensitive to each child’s remarkable capacity for intensity.

Making is predicated on the desire that we all have to exert agency over our lives, to solve our own problems. It recognizes that knowledge is a consequence of experience, and it seeks to democratize access to a vast range of experience and expertise so that each child can engage in authentic problem solving.”

Empowering students to create, innovate, and turn their ideas into reality is at the heart of the Maker Movement.

Why is making important?

Traditionally, schools have undervalued kinesthetic learning. Kinesthetic learning (or tactile learning) is a learning style in which takes place by the students carrying out physical activities, rather than listening to a lecture or watching demonstrations. The Maker Movement shows us the value of learning with the head, heart, and hands.

There are many ways that educators and parents alike can nurture “making” forms of expression: creating videos, collages, dioramas, or dances are just a few examples.  The tools used are less important than what is produced and the intellectual processes employed.

Make it… today! 2016 Capitol Hill Maker Faire is June 21

The Capitol Hill Maker Faire on June 21 celebrates Making as a part of the National Week of Making, June 17-23. It will be a fun and interactive event for members of the public, members of Congress, and staff.

Hosted by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, in collaboration with the Congressional Maker Caucus, the event explores the movement that is changing the face of informal learning at community institutions and is breathing new life and innovation into American manufacturing.

The event is free and open to the public.

Preceding the Faire, there will a series of panel discussions with leaders of the Maker movement discussing its impact on the economy, education, and community development.

If your child a Kinesthetic Learner…

The kinesthetic student learns by doing. This student is often labeled a fidgeter and is generally not successful when long stretches of quiet time or listening are required. By recognizing and understanding your child’s dominant learning style, you can implement the strategies that will truly help him learn faster, retain more information, and generally feel more confident about school.

Resources for your Kinesthetic Learner:

Arts and Creative Projects:

Models, dioramas, experiments:

Need more help? Back to Basics 1-on-1 Private School in Wilmington, Delaware may be the answer!

If your student is struggling to integrate his learning style with the teaching style at his current school, the summer is the perfect opportunity to explore options. Since 1985, Back to Basics K-12 Private School has offered a unique educational opportunity for students of all ages. With an unprecedented teacher-to-student ratio of 1:1, Back to Basics fosters a nurturing environment with hands-on teaching and testing methods, as well as careful matching of teaching and learning styles.

The experienced, degreed instructors at this Delaware Department of Education-approved K-12 Private School will help determine your child’s strengths and non-strengths, increase confidence, boost self-esteem, and encourage a love of learning, resulting in academic success.

Students may enter at any time during a school year, and stay for one to three consecutive years, at which time they merge into a more traditional school setting or graduate from our school.

With our location in Wilmington, we serve New Castle County, Delaware and surrounding areas of Pennsylvania and Maryland. For more information or to arrange a visit, call Back to Basics K-12 Private School at 302.594.0685.

Back to Basics Learning Dynamics is the undisputed leader in 1-on-1 tutoring in Delaware and southeastern Pennsylvania for over 60 subjects.

The company also offers 1-on-1 instruction for the SAT, ACT and Test Prep, translating and interpreting in 16+ languages, educational testing and more. For more information about Back to Basics’ educational services, please call us at 302-594-0754.

The company also operates a unique Department of Education-approved 1-on-1 K-12 Private School in Wilmington, Delaware. For more information about Delaware’s only Department of Education approved 1-on-1 private school, please call us at 302-594-0685.

Related posts: